Assessment Report

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Data Which Are Representative of the College of Business

Recently the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) has required that all institutions accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) should make assessment data available to the public. Although the requirement does not mandate that the institution post all assessment data, it does "require institutions or programs routinely to provide reliable information to the public on their performance, including student achievement as determined by the institution or program."

The Dallas Baptist University College of Business invites you to peruse this data which we have collected regarding our program. The following data are not comprehensive, but rather representative of the data that we analyze for quality assurance and continuous improvement of our program.

Student Retention Rates

Retention rates can reveal certain things about a program:

  1. The College of Business (COB), at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, has faculty who engage students. Students need to have professors who are willing to spend time with them. Even if a course is taught online rather than in the classroom, it is important for the professor to respond quickly and appropriately to student questions and their needs. When faculty are engaging, helpful, and encouraging, then a majority of students will stay with a program and ultimately graduate.
  2. When students have both academic and social needs that are being met by the program, they will stay in the program longer. The academic needs may be obvious, the social needs less so. Many undergraduate students live on campus, and even those who live off campus will spend a great number of hours on campus. When a university and a program provide forums for social interaction, facilities for campus-based activities, and opportunities for Service Learning and community interaction, then students will feel fulfilled and needed. When students believe that the university and program support their academic and social needs, then they will stay with the program in order to graduate.
  3. Faculty members who encourage students to stay with the program until completion communicate a belief in the ability of the student to succeed. When students see for themselves that classmates, friends, and cohorts are graduating, they believe that they also can achieve the goal of graduation.
  4. When students receive effective advising they have a tendency to complete the journey towards graduation. If the road map is clear, if the advisors work with the best interest of the student at heart, and if the uncertainty of the future is ameliorated, then students can proceed to completion of their degree with a certain confidence.
  5. A university and program that create a setting that fosters learning will see a higher retention rate. Students have a thirst for knowledge that draws them to higher education. When an institute of higher education creates an atmosphere that encourages life-long learning, then the students will respond by completing degrees and other education goals.

The following is representative of the College of Business retention rates. In 2006 and 2007 DBU admitted 1,039 students who declared that they would be working toward a BBA or BBS degree with a business major. Of the 428 BBA students, approximately 63% have either graduated or are still active students at the university. Of the 611 BBS students, approximately 65.5% have either graduated or are still active students at the university. This does not take into account those students who transferred from other programs into either the University or the COB.

Student Satisfaction Results

Every semester the College of Business, including the Graduate School of Business, administers a survey to our students. Part of the information gleaned from the answers provides a snapshot of the satisfaction of our students with our program in the College of Business. The following information is used for Quality Assurance and Continuous Improvement of the program. All answers are tabulated on a 5 point scale.

The MBA Annual Report

The annual report provides a glimpse into the focus of the MBA program for the 2011 – 2012 academic year. The MBA from an American university is still considered to be the gold standard when businesses and organizations consider prospective employees.

Graduate School of Business (GSB)
Master of Business Administration

GOAL 1:

MBA graduates will have the knowledge and technical skills they need to perform in their chosen profession.

LEARNER-CENTERED OUTCOME:

The MBA curriculum at DBU will provide students with course offerings required to compete in a diverse, dynamic, global, business context. The Business Communication curriculum at DBU will provide students with tools that will equip them to effectively communicate a much needed corporate vision of the “what we do and why we do it” aspect of organizational cultures. The overall program concentration options will be a result of our responsiveness to not only students’ needs, but to those of the business community and of society overall. We will respond with programs that are Christ-centered, of high academic quality, and that will produce servant leaders regardless of their chosen business vocation.

ASSESSMENT TOOLS:

Full-time faculty and the GSB leadership team conducted a complete review of the Business Communication concentration offered within the MBA program based on students’ needs, those of corporate partners, and of society overall. The review showed the need to delete the current curriculum required within the Business Communication concentration and to replace it with more relevant communication course work.

RESULTING DATA:

The proposed / approved Business Communication program changes are detailed below:

Curriculum through 2011/2012 Changes Made for 2012
BUCM 6301 Directing Organization Communication Deleted
BUCM 6302 Customer-Centric Communication Deleted
BUCM 6304 Leadership in Global Business Communication Deleted
MANA 6312 Communication & Business Behavior Deleted from Concentration only
Added from Master of Arts in Communication COMA 6305 Presentation Communication
Added from Master of Arts in Communication COMA 6307 Communication Leadership for Groups
Added from Master of Arts in Communication COMA 6309 Social Media & Communication
Added from Master of Arts in Communication COMA 6321 Strategic Communication for Organizations
ASSESSMENT REVIEW:

The changes were proposed / approved by the Graduate Programs Committee in Fall of 2011 for implementation in the Spring 2012 semester.

CONCLUSIONS DRAWN:

Changes to the Business Communication concentration were necessary.

SPECIFIC IMPROVEMENT MADE DURING 2011-2012 REPORTING PERIOD:

The needs of our students, corporate partners, and society overall will continue to be tracked over the coming years so that we fulfill the DBU mission as stated to produce servant leaders. Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, we will assess program effectiveness by formally surveying our stakeholders’ satisfaction 1, 3, and 5 years post-graduation

GOAL 2:

Students enrolling in graduate level accounting courses will possess basic accounting knowledge so that they are positioned to succeed in these courses.

Learner-Centered Outcomes:

Requiring prerequisite accounting knowledge before enrolling in ACCT 6330, ACCT 6335 and ACCT 6346 will result in better student performance in these courses.

Assessment Tools:

Faculty teaching those three graduate level courses have seen students struggle with the course material because they lacked the underlying accounting knowledge necessary to work at the graduate level in accounting. Beginning in the Fall of 2010, undergraduate course prerequisites were added for these graduate level accounting courses as part of the curriculum changes. Degree audits were conducted for all BBA and MBA accounting majors to assure that the new prerequisites could be met. Deficiencies were discovered among the current MBA enrollees which led to additional offerings of undergraduate prerequisite courses. Though the prerequisites were in place in Fall 2010, and being enforced in most cases, strict application of prerequisite requirements was delayed until Fall 2011 to allow existing MBA students (prior to Fall 2010) to complete their degrees without undue hardship.

Beginning with Fall 2011, strict adherence to the prerequisites was required. Grades in the three affected graduate courses have been analyzed since the Spring 2009 semester. The continuation of data collection and analysis allowed us to determine if adding the prerequisites improved student performance.

Resulting Data and Observations:

Assessment Review:

Student performance in ACCT 6330 improved from a B average to a B+ average and student performance in ACCT 6346 improved from a B average to an A average after enforcing the prerequisite courses. This is a strong indication that the prerequisite courses are contributing to increased student understanding in these courses.

Student performance in ACCT 6335 was declining prior to the requirement of prerequisite courses. The professor for this course was finding it necessary to teach the undergraduate material rather than concentrate on the graduate course material. With prerequisite enforcement, which began after the Spring 2011 semester, only the graduate material is being covered in class and student performance has rebounded.

Conclusions and Specific Improvements Made During 2011/2012 Reporting Period:

Requiring graduate students to complete basic level courses prior to enrolling in graduate accounting courses has increased student learning and performance. The prerequisite requirements will remain in place.

SPECIFIC IMPROVEMENT MADE DURING 2011-2012 REPORTING PERIOD:

We will continue to track future program results in order to implement interventions when it is determined that improvements are required. The Chair of the GSB will begin comparing specific results of each of the students in light of their concentration area when entering the program and each of the courses taken relative to their individual performance for additional insight.

Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, we will assess program effectiveness by formally surveying our stakeholders’ satisfaction 1, 3, and 5 years post-graduation.

The Master of Arts in Management Annual Report

The annual report provides a glimpse into the focus of the MA program for the 2011 – 2012 academic year. The MA in Management program provides the communication, leadership, and management skills needed in today’s business organizations. Because the business environment is dynamic, special attention is given to adapting to organizational change, performance management, and to becoming an agent of change.

Graduate School of Business
Master of Arts in Management

Goal 1:

MA in Management graduates will have the knowledge and technical skills they need to perform in their chosen profession.

LEARNER-CENTERED OUTCOME:

The MA in Management curriculum at DBU will provide students with course offerings required to compete in a diverse, dynamic, global, and business context. The core curriculum at DBU will provide students with course offerings required by general manager level professionals in the fields of health care, human resources, mediation and general management. The MA in Management program has been revised (Spring 2010) to strengthen and add depth to the course curriculum. Courses were updated to align theories and applications relative to the changing business environment. Course revisions were made to enhance student’s knowledge, skills and competencies required in today’s global competitive business environment. We believe prospective students will be more attracted to the revised program as they are returning to graduate school to retool skills and competencies in order to be more competitive in the workforce. These changes brought the degree program up to date, and as a result the MA in Management degree offered at DBU is more competitive with other universities in the area.

ASSESSMENT TOOLS:

In order to improve the quality of the program, the GSB leadership team and the appropriate full-time faculty conducted a complete review of the overall curriculum based on the requirements in content specific to the needs of the general manager. The review showed the need to revise the current core curriculum to meet the requirements by adding courses such as finance and marketing for the practitioner. These changes were integrated and implemented with the Spring 2010 catalog.

RESULTING DATA:

The proposed / approved changes are detailed below:

Curriculum through 2009 Changes Made for 2010
MANA 6310 Leadership in Management None
MANA 6312 Communication and Business Behavior MANA 6316, High Performance Work Teams deleted; content incorporated here
MANA 6314 Managing Change Change title, Organizational Change & Development. MANA 6321, Organization Behavior, deleted; content incorporated here
MANA 6319 Operational Finance, new course added
MANA 6316 High Performance Work Teams Deleted; content incorporated into MANA 6312
MANA 6320 Business Ethics None
MANA 6321 Organizational Behavior Deleted; content incorporated into MANA 6314
MANA 6323 Human Resource Management Change title, Human Resource Strategy
MANA 6360 Problems and Challenges Change title, Managerial Strategy & Implementation
MRKT 6341 Advanced Marketing Strategies, new course for this degree & core requirement
ASSESSMENT REVIEW:

The changes were proposed to / approved by the university’s Graduate Programs Committees in November of 2009 for implementation in the Spring 2010 semester.

CONCLUSIONS DRAWN:

The very necessary changes to the MA in Management degree were radical in terms of the core degree requirements. We reassessed our student needs and believe(d) them to be primarily of the General Manager level of perspective. We are monitoring success with student feedback throughout their academic journey, as they matriculate through to graduation and beyond; program growth is also a determinant indicator of success resulting from these substantial changes. We will continue in a transitional state until everyone has graduated from under the previous catalog requirements. Students will be allowed to complete their degrees without undue hardship associated with these changes, and they have been given the option to choose the new catalog requirements which many have done.

SPECIFIC IMPROVEMENT MADE DURING 2011-2012 REPORTING PERIOD:

The effects of the new changes will continue to be tracked over the coming years. Our expectation is that these revisions will create an increase in student satisfaction from the credibility of their degree both within the business organization in which they serve and within our partnerships with corporate clients. The MA in Management Program has grown in number of students enrolled by 10% as expected, which will ultimately increase the effectiveness of our mission statement and our ability to produce servant leaders at DBU.

Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, we will assess program effectiveness by formally surveying our stakeholders’ satisfaction 1, 3, and 5 years post-graduation.

GOAL 2:

MA in Management graduates with a concentration in General Management will have the knowledge and technical skills they need to perform successfully in their chosen profession. Our graduates with a concentration in General Management will have diverse knowledge and skills that manage across functional and organizational borders with focus on a broad operational and human capital perspective.

LEARNER-CENTERED OUTCOME:

The MA in Management General Management curriculum at DBU will provide students with course offerings required to compete in a diverse, dynamic, global, and business context. The concentration course(s) curriculum at DBU will provide students with course offerings required by general manager level professionals in the fields of health care, human resources, mediation and general management.

ASSESSMENT TOOLS:

In order to improve the quality of the concentration the GSB leadership team and the appropriate full-time faculty conducted a complete review of the General Management Concentration curriculum based on the requirements in content specific to the needs of the general manager. The review showed the need to have specific course requirements defined for this concentration, rather than multiple options available for choice by students. The need for a prescriptive approach to curriculum requirements was approved, deleting courses and strengthening the general management concentration content requirements. The General Management concentration was revised to reflect leadership skills and competencies relative to a mid-management career path. Courses in the revised concentration include Project Management, International Management, Conflict Resolution, and Operations and Quality Management. These courses were selected to target mid-management level prospects that have work experience but limited or non-existent graduate school education. We believe the Project Management course, in particular, will be a draw for students who need project management training but not PMI certification. These new revisions are part of a strategic plan to attract additional students to the General Management concentration and the main Management Program as a whole.

RESULTING DATA:

The proposed / approved changes are detailed below:

Curriculum through 2009 Changes Made for 2010
MANA 6352 International Human Resource Management Deleted from General Management concentration
MANA 6311 International Management, added to the General Management concentration
PROJ 6301 Project Overview, Strategic Process, and Project Initiation, added to the General Management concentration
CRMN 6310 Conflict Resolution Management None
Deleted; content incorporated into MANA 6312 None
CRMN 6320 Advanced Family Mediation Deleted from General Management concentration
CRMN 6321 Advanced Business Mediation Deleted from General Management concentration
CRMN 6330 Internship in Mediation Deleted from General Management concentration
MANA 6347 Career Management and Life Transitions Deleted from General Management concentration
MANA 6343 Compensation and Performance Deleted from General Management concentration
MANA 6342 Employee Negotiations & Collective Bargaining Deleted from General Management concentration
MANA 6305 Staffing Organizations Deleted from General Management concentration
MANA 6301 Employment Law Deleted from General Management concentration
ASSESSMENT REVIEW:

The changes were proposed to / approved by the university’s Graduate Programs Committee in November of 2009 for implementation in the Spring 2010 semester.

CONCLUSIONS DRAWN:

The very necessary changes to the MA in Management degree, and specifically the General Management concentration, were radical in terms of the core degree requirements as well as associated with this specific concentration, and we continue to monitor stakeholder satisfaction as a result of the changes. We reassessed our student needs and believe(d) them to be primarily of the General Manager level of perspective. We are monitoring success with student feedback throughout their academic journey as they matriculate through to graduation and beyond. Program growth (+10%) is also a determinant indicator of success resulting from these substantial changes. We continue in a transitional state until everyone has graduated from under the previous catalog requirements. Students are allowed to complete their degrees without undue hardship associated with these changes, and they have been given the option to choose the new catalog requirements, which many have done.

SPECIFIC IMPROVEMENT MADE DURING 2010-2011 REPORTING PERIOD:

The effects of the new changes will continue to be tracked over the coming years. Our expectation is that these revisions will create an increase in student satisfaction with the credibility of their degree both within the business organization in which they serve and within our partnerships with corporate clients. Program growth is also expected, which will ultimately increase the effectiveness of our mission statement and our ability to produce servant leaders at DBU.

Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, we will assess program effectiveness by formally surveying our stakeholders’ satisfaction 1, 3, and 5 years post-graduation.

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